Dulais Valley

Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic some local attractions, events and businesses may not be operating as advertised. Please plan ahead. We recommend that you directly contact the places you are intending to visit before traveling to our destination.

 

Let’s all work together to keep each other safe by following Welsh Government guidelines whilst enjoying what the Dramatic Heart of Wales has to offer.

Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic some local attractions, events and businesses may not be operating as advertised. Please plan ahead. We recommend that you directly contact the places you are intending to visit before traveling to our destination.

 

Let’s all work together to keep each other safe by following Welsh Government guidelines whilst enjoying what the Dramatic Heart of Wales has to offer.

Once, heavy industry attracted people to the Dulais Valley. Nowadays, it’s the tourism industry.

Although miners and tinplate workers have long since left the valley, tourists are now drawn here to learn about its important role in the Industrial Revolution.

 

Cefn Coed Colliery was once the deepest anthracite mine in the world. At its museum, visitors discover why it earned the unenviable nickname of ‘The Slaughterhouse’.

 

At Aberdulais, they harnessed hydro power as far back as 1584. The works later provided the world with a revolutionary new technology – tinplate. Now a National Trust site, Aberdulais Tin Works and Waterfall tells the story of this area’s journey from industrial centre in the backdrop of its beautiful and easily accessible waterfall.

 

Of course, we didn’t just export coal and tinplate from the Dulais Valley; there’s good evidence that the village of Banwen was the birthplace of St Patrick, patron saint of Ireland.

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